Tag Archives: Orange

Mood Scent 4 – Uplifting Perfumes

Welcome to the latest instalment in the Mood Scent 4. joint blogging project,

We are four perfume bloggers from France, Holland, England and Wales who post on a different joint subject every couple of months.  Each time we pick a selection of fragrances to fit a particular mood or occasion. You’ll find links to the other blogs at the end of the post.

Previous posts have been on the topics of Rainy Day Perfumes, Wedding Guest Perfumes and Mainstream Perfumes. Today the topic is Uplifting Perfumes.

 

 

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Really, any perfume you love can be uplifting but some types of fragrances can be  depended upon to raise most people’s spirits. Aromatherapy will tell you orange is the most mood-boosting aroma and I agree many perfumes in this citrus category can do the trick.

My personal favourite for an instant up-tick in outlook is Eau de Mandarine Ambrée by Hermès. The scent of mandarins is pure happiness to me, perhaps because I was given tinned mandarins segments in syrup as a dessert when a child.

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Eau de Mandarin Ambrée is from Les Cologne Collection but the citrus is supported by amber which prolongs its life significantly. Hermès are generally a good bet for classy orange scents with the classic Eau D’Orange Verte, the orange-tinted beach scent Eau des Merveilles and last year’s Eau de Néroli Doré.

Orange Sanguine by Atelier Cologne is like a morning class of fresh orange juice, while the mainstream have Clinique Happy and Boss Orange.

Related to citrus scents but fuller and obviously more floral, are the orange blossom perfumes. They feel like inhaling the scent of blossom on the breeze in early summer. It’s uplifting but in a more languid, sensual way.  For an added burst of zingy lemon in the opening and extra longevity, there’s the golden orange blossom of Cologne Indélébile by Editions de Parfums Frederic Malle

The two I own though, are the limited edition Fleur d’Oranger and Seville a L’Aube, both by L’Artisan Perfumeur. The latter is a combination of honeyed orange blossom, caramelised lavender and a wisp of incense. If you fall for it you can read all about its development in The Perfume Lover by Denyse Beaulieu.

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Sometimes just the name of a perfume is enough to make you smile. Tart’s Knicker Drawer by 4160 Tuesdays is just as playful as its name. This is a vintage-style boudoir scent topped with raspberry. Put it on and enjoy that fun, flirty feeling. If someone asks you what you’re wearing, that’s an added bonus.

How about a perfume inspired by the glittering world of Bollywood that also has an exclamation mark at the end? Bombay Bling! by Neela Vermeire Creations is characterised by a fabulously joyous and super juicy mango note. Spray it and just see if you can resist the urge to smile

 

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Aldehydes are the party perfume ingredient with their bubbly spray of champagne foam. My favourite Vega is no longer available but there are some others out there including of course, the most recent youthful incarnation of the Chanel classic, No. 5 L’Eau.

Other easily obtainable old school aldehydic perfumes are Lanvin Arpege, Ivoire de Balmain and YSL’s Rive Gauche.

 

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Be sure to check out my fellow bloggers’ choices of Uplifting Perfumes at Megan In Sainte Maxine, L’Esperessence and I Scent You A Day.

 

What perfumes to you turn to when you need a bit of cheering up?

 

 

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Moon Bloom, Shangri La and Dilettante by Hiram Green

When artisan perfumer Hiram Green kindly offered to send me fragrance samples from his home in The Netherlands, the first one I thought of was Arbolé Arbolé. I’d heard great things about it but as it turned out, this was the one that suited me the least (I find orientals tricky). Therefore I’ll refer you to Val the Cookie Queen’s wonderful post about it on APJ here.

Below are my thoughts on the other three, all-natural, Eau de Parfums.

 

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Shangri La 

Notes: Citrus, peach, jasmine, rose, iris, spices, vetiver, and oakmoss. 

Shangri La is Hiram Green’s interpretation of the classic chypre, a century after Coty started the genre with the original of the same name.

Of course this is a modern version but its genre is recognisable straight away.  There’s peachy citrus undercut by a background of oakmoss, which instantly reminds me of  Mitsouko.  You should give Shangri La a try if you already love the iconic Guerlain or you want to but don’t, because this is much more accessible.  It still has the humid feel and oakmoss of Mitsouko but the peach is much more juicy.  Shangri La possesses that full-bodied sophistication that is so characteristic of chypres.

 

Dilettante

Notes: Orange Flower, Petitgrain, Orange Essential Oil

I’m always hopeful when trying an orange blossom perfume but all too often they are overly soapy or indolic. However Dilettante is pitch perfect. Within the first few seconds alone I get all the aromatic aspects of the orange tree: zesty fruit, green leaves and lush blossom.

Orange blossom, pettigrain and orange essential oil are such fantastic natural materials that they are ideal for an all-natural perfume. You really don’t need much else. Dilettante is smooth, sunlit and full of orange flower goodness, becoming mellower yet richer over time.  It moves through all the shades of orange from bright flame through to burnished gold. It’s a simple composition that just works. Summer is exactly the right time to try it too: no other type of fragrance is so full of liquid sunshine. Yum.

 

Moon Bloom

Notes: Tuberose Absolute, Jasmine Absolute, Ylang Ylang, Coconut, Leafy Greens, Spices and Resins.

I own some tuberose absolute and I much prefer it to the often headache inducing synthetic version. It is fresh, narcotic, tropical, buttery and fleshy, as well as deeply sensual. You get all of that in Moon Bloom as well as the facet that smells like bubblegum. Admittedly tuberose is not my favourite material but I appreciate it for how incredibly striking and complex it is.  Here it’s complemented with other white florals and fresh green notes.

In contrast to most tuberose perfumes, Moon Boom hums at a low register, intensifying its sultry feel. The coconut is not immediately obvious but adds a creamy texture and rounds out the composition while also accentuating the exotic feel, stopping short of beachy. This is a nocturnal fragrance for hot and humid nights and a must-try for tuberose fans.

 

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None of these three fragrances suffer from the dual criticisms of flatness or short-life which are usually leveled at natural perfumery. All are available in a 50ml bottle and 10ml Travel Size (hurrah!).

Have you tired any of Hiram Green’s perfumes? If not, do any of the above pique your interest?

 

 

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Curious EdP and Perfume by Aftelier Perfumes

Notes: Tobacco, Hay, Smoke, Orange Leaf, Siam Wood and Dirty Orange.

 

A project that has been three years in the making has finally come to fruition: the Aftel Archive of Curious Scents is now open in Berkeley, California.  Here, artisan perfumer Mandy Aftel shares her personal and unique collection of aromatic materials and antique books.

Visitors can experience over three hundred natural essences and connect with the ingredients that have inspired people over centuries, but which are sadly used much less in perfumery today.

 

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The ambergris exhibit: Archive of Curious Scents

 

The atmosphere of the Archive was the inspiration behind Curious, the latest release from Aftelier Perfumes. There is even an exhibit that breaks down the fragrance note by note so that visitors can see how the essences weave together to create the finished scent.

 

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The camphor-like, leafy opening of Curious suggests bracing air and pine forests.  As it settles, there is the scent of green saplings and creamy white woods over a beguiling mixture of moss and ash. ‘Dirty orange’ is a great descriptor because while the orange leaf is verdant and fresh at the start, it later morphs into a spiral of peel rubbed with earth. I think it’s the orange nuances which lift Curious and give it an extra dimension.

The drydown is a smoky botanical musk; unlike anything I’ve tried before.  The smokiness isn’t tarry or rubbery the way it is in leather fragrances – or indeed the fantastic Vanilla Smoke.  Imagine instead slender grey plumes twisting skywards from a woodland fire.

Mandy thinks of tobacco absolute as nature’s musk and combined with hay absolute the way it is in Curious, creates an aromatic muskiness without the laundry sheet or skanky facets often present in synthetic musks. It drapes across the skin and melds with your own chemistry.

It’s redolent of the outdoors while possessing the texture of fur and the way it plays with the animal and the vegetal is compelling. As usual, Mandy has made a composition that is as clever as it is rewarding.

Unlike many smoky/musky perfumes, Curious has an enigmatic quality that makes it beautifully mysterious.

When comparing the EdP and the Perfume, I would say the EdP is airier with more swirling smoke, while the Perfume is more potent but sits closer to the skin. Out of the two, the EdP is more my style, but I can see plenty of people soaking up the depth of the Perfume.

In either formulation, it is a fascinating fragrance in the truest sense of the word. Its complexity and presence hold my attention with ease. It absolutely does trigger your curiosity as you try and get a handle on exactly what you’re inhaling.

If Curious is what the Archive smells like then it must be a feast for the senses as well as an enthralling exploration into the history of perfumery.

 

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Do you like the idea of a smoky musk perfume? Would you love to visit the Archive of Curious Scents one day?

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