Monthly Archives: July 2019

Most Worn – Summer 2019

I don’t plan on posting perfume reviews during August and Strange Tales From The Cookie Queen will be taking a break until the end of the month. However, Portia will be joining ABR on a monthly basis (yay) and inspired by her own excellent Summer List, I thought I’d share my own most worn perfumes this season.

The U.K. has experienced another heatwave this year with temps hitting an all-time high for July last Thursday of 38.1 degrees Celsius (about 101F). No joke when you don’t have aircon. Thank goodness for the cooling, distracting powers of perfume.

 

Eau de Rochas by Rochas

I love this cheapie from 1970 so much. You may not envisage it from the wide-ranging notes list but Eau de Rochas is all about lime and patchouli on me The tart lime against the raspy patch is bliss and has been perfect for muggy (overcast, humid) days. It makes a pleasant change from the white flowers or clean citrus. The bottle fits in well with my home décor too which is a bonus, haha.

Frangipani by Ormond Jayne

A dear friend in Sydney gave me a travel spray of this swoon-inducing fragrance when I stayed with her last summer. It reminds me of her every time I wear it. Frangipani is my favourite of the OJ white florals. It’s all creamy petals and tropical langour with zero screechiness. A squeeze of lime cuts through the buttery flowers like an ocean breeze.  The carefree, barefoot feeling it gives me is priceless: carrying me off to the Polynesian islands which I hope to visit for real one fine day.

 

 

Eau de Mandarine Ambrée by Hermes

The Hermes Eau de Cologne collection is top-notch and in an ideal world I’d own all of them. Eau de Mandarine Ambrée takes the fruity note that makes me the most happy – mandarin – and combines it with a lightweight, sunlit amber to extend its lasting power. My friend was disappointed that the mandarin didn’t last longer and gifted me her bottle but it doesn’t bother me. It can be a little syrupy so I wear it when the heat is in the low to mid twenties.

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Prodigieux le parfum by NUXE

I love the original NUXE multi-use oil – it has a sprayer and dries quickly, as well as smelling great. The scent reminds me of summer holidays sur le continent. Where others cite Bronze Goddess as their beach perfume of choice, I’m not so fond of the prominent coconut accord. Prodigieux le parfum is the perfect beachy scent for me with its notes of orange blossom, magnolia and vanilla. It brings me all those old school sun lotion vibes while I’m chained to the office desk. I only wear it when the temperature hits the high 20s. It doesn’t feel right to be laying on the sand – olfactory speaking –  otherwise.

 

 

 

Iris Silver Mist by Serge Lutens layered with Seville a L’Aube by L’Artisan Parfumeur

Here’s the curveball. EauMG recently posted a fantastic Instagram story about how she was standing next to an older lady who looked like an ex-model and smelt amazing. She screwed up her courage and asked what she was wearing. It turned out to be Chanel’s Paris-Venise (neroli, vanilla, tonka) layered with Iris Silver Mist. MIND BLOWN. I don’t own the Chanel so I improvised with the orange blossom oriental Seville a L’Aube instead. It it worked well. The Artisan can be a little ‘thick’ and sweet so ISM’s cool steeliness was a great counterbalance. I just need to use a bit less SaL’A or flip the order because I lost that stunning iris after a while.

 

How’s your summer coming along? Any perfumes you’ve been loving in the heat?

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Portia’s Summer List

Hi there A Bottled Rosers. Thanks again Tara for letting me infiltrate you inner sanctum.

I come from Australian Perfume Junkies and would like to share some of my all-time favourite fragrances. Each season, according to your Northern Hemisphere weather, I’ll tell you what I have that gets quite a bit of wear. So Portia’s Summer List will be like a personal all-star list.

SUMMER! Suddenly the world is hot. Wearing way less clothing, floaty linens and cottons for choice. If the seaside is within driving or transport distance there are lazy beach days (personally I am a pool fan, no sharks or sand). Salads jump to the front of the food order and light, easy drinking wines flow all afternoon. I tend to either look for shimmering, cool colognes or lean into the heat with heavy middle eastern concoctions, both perfectly viable summer expressions of fragrance.

Here is a photo of Tara, Anna Maria, Jin and me in Venice a few years ago. We have definitely had some amazing adventures together.

Aqua Allegoria Lys Soleia by Guerlain

Lily, yang, vanilla and fruits all combine to create a creamy tropical dream. This is not the usual tart cologne of the Aqua Allegoria line but a rich, sophisticated and long lasting gem. It always smells to me like there’s coconut in the mix as well. On the long hot days of summer Lys Soleia will fit right in with its golden smelling extravagance.

Geranium Pour Monsieur by Frederic Malle

Imagine arcticly frigid mint and incense facing off against anise, clove and resins in a refreshing, utterly unique blend. Nothing smells quite like it and very little on the shelves will give you such a jolt of cool wind in your flagging sails. Geranium Pour Monsieur is the ultimate frosty spritz.

Granville by DIOR

It’s no secret how much I love Granville. A classic cologne with lemon, thyme and rosemary twisted through fresh pine needles and a peppery snap. Its sharp, awakening burst is an excellent foil for those summer days when you are hurried, sweating and uncomfortable. A couple of spritzes and you are good to go.

Niki de Saint Phalle

Where would summer be without a dry, rasping, uptight chypre that flows into a mossy cuddle bunny? It would be a very dreary summer indeed. Niki de Saint Phalle has been one of my favourite summer spritzes for years, friendlier than CHANEL No 19 and less floral that Piguet Futur I find NdSP a perfect balance.

Rahele by Neela Vermeire Creations

Osmanthus, leather, violet and modern oakmoss all drizzled perfectly over some white flowers. Rahele is the sleeper of the Neela Vermeire Creations oeuvre, it easily gets the most wear across the year of all the NVCs. It was my wedding fragrance, fits with any mood or event and has a quiet elegance few fragrances can match.

Ubar by Amouage

When I want to push back at the heat with a burning brand of my own then the choice is often Ubar. I discovered its sublime hot weather qualities while travelling desert Rajasthan in India and have kept it in summer rotation ever since. A fruity white floral underscored by ambergris, vanilla, woods, patchouli and resins galore.

So what are you all wearing this summer?
Portia xx

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Galop d’ Hermes

Notes: Saffron, Quince, Rose, Osmanthus, Leather and Musks

 

Christina Nagel’s Twilly was chic with just right amount of quirk and her additions to the Hermessence line have been stellar, with my particular favourite being the radiant jasmine, Cedre Sambac. The oils are exquisite and if I had the budget, I’d purchase Musc Pallida in a heartbeat. The 2016 release of Galop continued the trend and lies somewhere between the two in terms of availability and price point.

Val the Cookie Queen fell hard for Galop and kindly gifted me with a large decant last winter. I’ve nearly drained it.

Let’s start by taking a look at that fabulous stirrup bottle…

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Galop has a very striking olfactory colour palette. To my mind it’s petal pink and saffron orange.  It is only available in Parfum concentration which, of course, has excellent lasting power but also retains a transparency that is very much in the classic style of the previous in-house perfumer, Jean Claude Ellena.

I never tire of the saffron, quince and rose accord. It’s masterfully crafted with no facet being out of kilter. The tart quince counters the sweetness of the rose and the savoury saffron bathes the whole composition in golden light.  It just sings. The saffron has a substantial presence but it’s not as pungent as it can be. I’m generally fond of it as a note but can find it overwhelming. Here it is perfectly pitched, gloriously bright and full but not too spicy.

The rose heart is pure pink, softly sweet and very pretty. It’s poles apart from a dark, sultry red rose. There is also a mouth-watering, juicy fruitiness which I imagine is coming from peachy osmanthus.

Hermes started making riding acoutremonts and so there is often a nod to leather in their fragrances. It’s present here but to my nose it’s more like blush suede.

Galop has just the right amount of tension between sweet and sour and this makes it moreish.

One perfume that I constantly turn to during spring/summer is Vaara by Penhaligon’s. It has a similar saffron/quince/rose combination but a lot lighter (EdP strength) and lacks any leather. Where Vaara dries done to a soft rose, Galop’s development doesn’t have any clear demarcations. The saffron merely becomes calmer and creamier.

It’s a fragrance I pick up in a hurry with the confidence that it always feels right. I can see Galop being the same only on a whole other level of elegance, complexity and quality.

I’ll have to content myself with the Penhaligon’s fragrance until I have the funds for the Hermes.

 

galop horse

Do you like saffron in fragrances? Have you tried Galop?

 

 

 

 

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Reading Diary May/June 2019

I used to regularly read literary fiction, often reading books that had won prizes or were lauded by The Literary Review. My success rate wasn’t great. I DNFed The Line of Beauty and The Corrections. I was baffled as to the fuss over The Life of Pi and Captain Correlli’s Mandolin. The end of Atonement ended me. Then it dawned on me that these books are often written by – and to impress – literary types. They sometimes mess around with the form, can be snobby and tend to favour a depressing ending. It felt like they were more concerned with showing off than providing people (like me) with a good read. So I more or less gave up on them and retreated into genre fiction. I’m trying not to rule them out  anymore and gradually dipping my toe back in does make me appreciate the quality of their writing.

 

Daughter of the Forest (Sevenwaters Trilogy Book One) by Juliet Marillier

“We draw our strength from the great oaks of the forest. As they take their nourishment from the soil, and from the rains that feed the soil, so we find our courage in the pattern of living things around us. They stand through storm and tempest. They grow and renew themselves. Like a grove of young oaks, we remain strong.”

daughter of the forest

When I told my friend about Daughter of the Forest she said she immediately knew it was my kind of book. The funny thing is that as I read it I kept thinking of Liz Moore of Papillon Perfumes to the point where I had to tell her about it. This was because the story is set 10th Century Ireland when many people still revered the nature spirits and honoured their festivals. The descritpions of the forest are lush and there re many references to flora and fauna. basically if Dryad were a book, it would Daugher of the Froest. As to the plot, it releved about young Sorcha who has a deep mystic connection to the forest. When her six brothers are cursed by a wicked stepmother the Fair Folk tell her what she must do to free them. This sets on her path that is more arduous than she could possible imainge but she is also finds kindess along the way. My only issue was it dragged a little towards the end of its 500+ pages and this put me off going straight on to Book Two in the trilogy but hopefully I’ll come to back it.  4/5 (Contains scenes of serious sexual assault.)

 

The Summer Without Men by Siri Hustvedt

“Some of us are fated to live in a box from which there is only temporary release. We of the damned-up spirits, of the thwarted feelings, of the blocked hearts, and the pent-up thoughts, we who long to blast out, flood forth in a torrent of rage or joy or even madness, but there is nowhere for us to go, nowhere in the world because no one will have us as we are, and there is nothing to do except to embrace the secret pleasures of our sublimations…”

A couple of reading Diaries ago there was a lot of enthusiasm in the comments fo the nvels of Siri Hustvedt. I looked at her back catalogue and while not the highest rated, this was the one that appealed to me. It’s about a poet in her mid-fities who has an episode of psychosis after her husband puts there marriage on pause to pursue a relationship with a co-worker. We meet Mia after she’s left the hospital and retreated to her small home town for the summer. Here she takes on a summer poetry class for adolesecent girls at the local school and visits her mother daily at her retirement complex.  We follow the interactions between her mother’s friends “The Swans” and the group of girls who indulge in the all too familiar prepubescent pastime of singling out the most ‘different’ for subtle and not-so-subtle ridicule. It’s a study in female relationships (and to a lesser extent, relationships between men and women) but it’s also about the varied ways women are constrained. Hustvedt is clearly a fiercely intelligent woman and though I’m not keen on narrators who drop in phrases in a foreign languages and talk directly to the reader, it was an accessible literary read overall. The small town setting and limited time span kept it intimate. I warmed to Mia immediately and eventually managed to get in sync with the slow pace and just enjoy it for what it was.  3/5

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Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata

“When something was strange, everyone thought they had the right to come stomping in all over your life to figure out why. I found that arrogant and infuriating, not to mention a pain in the neck. Sometimes I even wanted to hit them with a shovel to shut them up, like I did that time in elementary school. But I recalled how upset my sister had been when I’d casually mentioned this to her before and kept my mouth shut.”

There has been quite a buzz around this book with some even calling it the Japanese Eleanor Oliphant. Keiko like Eleanor, is socially inept but to a much greater degree. She has so little empathy, she appears to be sociopathic. At school she learns the best way to get by in life is to keep quiet. From there she gets a job at a convenience store and finds her true north. The store provides reassuring predictably and a role to perform. In fact she mimics the other employees in voice and dress to appear like ‘a normal person’. Keiko stays at the store for 18 years at which point she feels the pressure from those around her to make some kind of change in her life. Unlike Eleanor, there is no trauma beneath it all to make sense of her strangeness and allow the reader to empathise with her, but that’s kind of the point. No one is comfortable with her living an unconventional life even though she is perfectly content with it. A quick, quirky and engaging read. 4/5

convenience

 

Villette by Charlotte Bronte

“The negation of severe suffering was the nearest approach to happiness I expected to know. Besides, I seemed to hold two lives – the life of thought, and that of reality.”

villette

Jane Eyre is one of my favourite classics and so it makes me sad that Millenials often dislike it because they focus on the ‘problematic’ relationship with Mr Rochester rather than Jane’s incredible strength of character. When looking to get back into reading classics, I chose this much lesser known work which was Charlotte’s final novel. There are echoes of Jane Eyre with Lucy Snowe being a friendless introvert who is trying to survive in the world after a history of tragedy. Jane Eyre isn’t especially likeable but Miss Snowe is hard to warm to. I grew to understand and empathise with her however. She is the way she is as the result of her past and her circumstances. She is fearful that the rug could be pulled from under her at any point and is constantly steeling herself for disappointment. It’s a bleak book but that was Charlotte’s experience of life and I feel a kind of kinship with her. It isn’t an easy read, not least because I don’t speak French and there is untranslated dialogue throughout. 3/5

 

Mad Girl by Bryony Gordon

“Your parents warn you about the monsters you might encounter in dark alleyways, but they never warn you about the monsters you might find in your own mind, the ones that taunt and trouble you, and make you question yourself to your very core.”

Bryony Gordon is a journalist who wrote a best-selling memoir The Wrong Knickers about her wild twenties . What she never mentioned in that book and what she explores here, is her longstanding mental health issues.  She battles an eating disorder, depression and OCD – not the ‘tidy sock drawer’ type of OCD but the kind which makes her believe she is a serial killing paedophile.  While it’s hard going through the world feeling you are not enough, it’s equally hard feeling you’re too much: too loud, too open, too greedy, too sexual, too much. Her story is sometimes heart-breaking but often hilarious. She can appreciate the absurdity and selfishness of her younger self and acknowledges that she was often simultaneously having a great time as a columnist for The Telegraph. 3/5

 

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How has your reading been this last month or two?

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