Category Archives: Perfume Reviews

Mood Scent 4 – Wedding Guest Perfumes

 

We are four perfume bloggers from four different places on the globe but together we are the Mood Scent 4. If you didn’t catch our first joint post, Rainy Day Perfumes, you can read mine here with links at the end to the others.

June has long marked the start of the traditional wedding season. Some of us will be getting ready to attend and wish the happy couple well, but what to wear? Of course, I’m referring to perfume.

For me it all depends on the location. Weddings can take place almost anyway these days but I’ve picked four of the most popular choices and paired each of them with an appropriate scent.  Yes, they are all florals of a kind but I don’t think someone else’s Big Day is the time to show off one’s edgy taste in fragrance.

 

Mood scent purple.png

 

The Church Wedding

No. 22, Chanel

You can’t get more demure and well behaved than Chanel so it’s the obvious choice for a church wedding. No. 22 is a bit more special than the house’s well known offerings because it’s part of Les Exclusifs. The combination of squeak clean aldehydes, orange blossom and a wisp of incense makes it very fitting for a religious ceremony. Orange blossom has a long history of being worn by brides in their headdresses and bouquets.

The Country House Wedding

Mito Voile d’Extrait, Vero Profumo

A classy countryside do like this needs a sophisticated but unstuffy scent to suit. Mito Volie d’Extrait is a perfect match for the grounds of a stately home or rural hotel with because it was inspired by the greenery, statues and fountains of a famed Italian garden. Fizzy and sherbet-y to start, Mito settles into a green floral with lush magnolia and just a touch of fleshy tuberose. It feels both joyful and elegant. Actually, my lovely friend The Candy Perfume Boy wore Mito at his own exquisite scented wedding in the country.Mito

The Destination Wedding

 

Frangipani, Ormonde Jayne

I’m all for jetting off and getting married somewhere tropical. So if you’re going to be celebrating the couple’s nuptuals on the beach, I recommend the beautiful Frangipani. It’s floaty and tasteful but the blooms are rich and creamy, perfectly sliced through with a dash of lime. This is a very romantic fragrance which is perfect for an exotic location. You could also go for the luggage friendly travel set.

 

The Chic City Wedding

Le Parfum de Therese, Editions de Parfums Frederic Malle

My interest in the Frederic Malle line has been reignited recently with travel bottle purchases of Superstitious and Iris Poudre.. For a cool and stylish registry office wedding in Marylebone or the likes, I’ve gone for Le Parfum de Therese. It already has a romantic backstory because perfumer Edmund Roudnitska created it for his wife in the 60s and it was only released to the world in 2010. It’s a classy fruity chypre with ripe plum and melon and a chic undertone of leather.

 

 

wedding.jpg

Make sure you check out the other Wedding Guest Perfume posts at Megan In Sainte Maxime, I Scent You A Day and L’Esperessence.

 

Which fragrance have you chosen to wear as a wedding guest?

20 Comments

Filed under Perfume Reviews

Undina in London at Last!

I started reading Undina’s Looking Glass when it first appeared on the blogosphere six years ago.  I’ve long been keen to meet Undina so I was extremely happy when she wrote to say she and her Very Significant Other would be visiting London from their home in San Francisco.  If only Rusty could have come too…

 

rustyandsubmarine2.jpg

Rusty: Have submarine, will travel?

 

We met outside Harrods just as it opened at 11.30 am on a sunny Sunday. Undina made me feel at ease immediately and her still jet-lagged vSO very accommodatingly wandered around the store as we hit the perfume trail.

Undina doesn’t publish her photograph online but you can see below what we got up to.

 

20170521_112441

 

First stop, the 6th floor and the rarefied atmosphere of the Salon de Parfum. Our timing was good because they had opened an additional six fragrance boutiques two weeks before, including Penhaligon’s, Armani Privé and Frederic Malle Editions de Parfums.

 

20170521_130602

 

Undina had wanted to check out the MDCI Parfums line while in London and already owns Chypre Palatin. Six fragrances are stocked in the Roja Dove perfumerie (three feminines and three masculines). We liked Un Coeur en Mai the most and when Undina said it reminded her of another perfume, I was very pleased with myself for spotting it resembled Chamade. Both are spring green florals with a pollen-y feel.

 

20170521_115750

20170521_115857

Roja Dove Haute Parfumerie

 

Guerlain’s  Muguet 2017 is a gorgeous lily of valley with rose, jasmine and green notes. If it were not for the sky high price I’d have happily bought a bottle.

 

20170521_121427

 

The new addition to L’Art et la Matière collection, Joyeuse Tubéreuse, surprised us by being not very tuberose-like. It’s a pretty floral bouquet with just a hint of super fresh tuberose. When the description says ‘airy’ (below), it’s not kidding. After about an hour it was extremely quiet.

 

20170521_121728

 

20170521_123004(0)

Above is the very Kilian-esque SA modelling the new Black Phantom. A boozy, woody fragrance with notes of rum, coffee, vetiver, cyanide, sugar cane and sandalwood.

Below is the Harrods exclusive Midnight in London which is £15,000 for the whole case (no more will be available).  The fragrance is a very nice mimosa-led floral which Undina liked best out of everything we tried. Oh the burden of expensive taste.

 

20170521_124241

By Kilian’s Midnight in London

 

I was excited that Frederic Malle had come to the Salon de Parfums because since my visit to the Burlington Arcade store with Val the Cookie Queen, I’ve been a little obsessed with the line.

 

20170521_124745

 

Of course I had to try out what the SA called ‘The Time Machine’. It’s a temperature controlled space for trying out fragrances in a diffused way.  Undina suggested spraying En Passant into it as it is the most fleeting. Sadly the first time if was so fleeting we could smell nothing, but on a second try we picked it up and it was lovely.

Next I tried Iris Poudre in the machine as I’m considering a full bottle purchase. This novel perfume delivery system is a bit of fun and maybe you do get a better idea than when you stick your nose onto a scent strip.

Undina disliked Superstitious on the card but loved it on me so that’s okay then.

 

20170521_131104.jpg

 

At Armani Privé we tried the Harrods exclusive which I have sadly zero recollection of. The good news is, however, that the coveted Limited Edition lipstick iris, La Femme Bleue, is coming back and will be permanent, if not widely available.

 

20170521_131014

You could go just to look at the gorgeous interiors…

20170521_131220

Back on the ground floor we went into the Black Hall and made a bee-line for Ormonde Jayne as it’s a favourite line of Undina’s and I own a couple of their perfumes too.  We tried yet another Harrods exclusive. This one is called Amber Royal and is a very pleasant floral amber.

Montabaco is their best seller and the one the SA told me the brand is now most known for. It’s a wearable, unisex tobacco scent but is part of the pricey Four Corners collection so the 50ml is £195. 

//


http://www.ormondejayne.com/js/lib/ds-sleight.js
http://www.ormondejayne.com/skin/frontend/base/default/js/ie6.js

 

20170521_132536

 

20170521_133353.jpg

 

At the Amouage counter I was impressed with Bracken Woman which smells exactly as you would expect and hope. Quite a contrast with the pink bottle. The notes are wild berries, fern, lily, narcissus, chamomile, leather, patchouli, vetiver and birch.

 

20170521_133410

20170521_114156

Undina noted the placement of Bond No. 9 by the toilets…

 

After lunch we met Vanessa of Bonkers about Perfume at Bloom in Covent Garden. It was so lovely to see her after she couldn’t join us for Val’s visit.

 

20170521_161936

 

Bloom looked quite a bit different. They have removed the glass cabinets which makes everything easily accessible now.  A good move.

 

20170521_161225

 

Vanessa and I enjoyed trying Hummingbird, a floral fragrance in the Zoologist line authored by Shelley Waddington of En Voyage Perfumes. My favourite is still the fur coat of Civet (also by Shelley).

 

20170521_161924

 

 

Vanessa tried quite a few from indie brand Imaginary Authors.

 

 

Undina has been trying to make her mind up as to which formulation of Mito by Vero Profumo to purchase. We all preferred the Voile in a side-by-side test.

 

20170521_162453

 

Bloom had a tiny bit left of a sample of the forthcoming tobacco perfume from Vero, Naja, for Undina to try. I can’t wait to own a bottle.

We had tea and cake at Patisserie Valerie (it seems to be the perfumistas cafe of choice) and then I said my farewells. I would have loved to stay longer with them all but the day and my cold were catching up on me. All the same it was wonderful to spend much of the day with Undina and her v.SO and to see Vanessa again.

I look forward to seeing Undina and her v.SO again one of these days, either in London or San Franciso (it’s on the list!)

 

38 Comments

Filed under Perfume Friends, Perfume Reviews, Perfume Shopping

Superstitious by Editions de Parfums Frederic Malle

Notes: Jasmine, Rose, Peach, Amber, Incense, Vetiver, Patchouli and Aldehydes.

 

I should know better by now than to buy even a travel sized bottle of perfume on the first sniff, but rules are made to be broken. Buying the recent Malle release, Superstitious, on the spot was a calculated risk though. Val the Cookie Queen already owned the 10ml bottle and I know if she says something is good, it’s good.

Superstitious was created in association with fashion designer Alber Elbaz and the perfumer is the great Dominique Ropion. It’s the second in the ‘par Frederic Malle’ collection; the first being Dries Van Noten.

 

20170510_112539

Superstitious with its evil eye

 

The main body of Superstitious is all about jasmine and aldehydes. Please don’t be put off (like me) by ‘The A Word’.  These aldehydes are of the fatty, waxy variety, not the fizzy, forceful kind. The effect feels like a glistening sheen on the skin.

I’ve long had a yearning for a jasmine perfume but until now I’ve always found them either too heady or too indolic. Here, the jasmine isn’t high-pitched or overly animalic. The combination of jasmine, aldehydes and a touch of almost creamy peach gives Superstitious an unfussy opulence; like a frothy mountain of tulle. Although superficially it appears spotless, there is a pinch of smutty spice just underneath those gauzy layers, which hints at things come…

The drydown of Superstitious is sensual in a lived-in, mussed up kind of way. The sales assistant told us that people are calling the scent “posh sex”, which is actually not a bad way of describing it – it’s pure refinement that’s been tempted to engage in pure debauchery.

The base is an incense-y, woody, vetiver that is attractive in an unconventional, broken down way. It’s as if you’ve been rolling around on the floor of an abandoned building, albeit in a ball gown.

For me, discovering a hidden filth scene can be much more exhilarating then a blatant show of carnality. Someone would have to wait until the end of the night to experience that unseemly side. Anything that is not quite what it seems at first look always intrigues me.

It’s a cleverly constructed composition, going from radiant and gleaming to earthy and deeply sensual. Be aware that it is a BIG perfume with day-into-night longevity.

Its floral aldehyde style may hark back to the grand perfumes of the first half of the twentieth century but Superstitious doesn’t read as vintage or even retro.  There’s an edge to this fragrance that makes it completely contemporary.

I’m normally not attracted to the large-scale perfumes like Carnal Flower for which Ropion is known for. However, I don’t find Superstitious overwhelming. It makes a statement but I apply it judiciously and it seems to meld with my skin. In fact, it possesses everything that draws me to a perfume: contrast, tension, mystery, sensuality, originality and unmistakable quality.

Superstitious is impossibly glamorous in the most undone, sexy way imaginable.

 

 

kate

 

I understand Superstitious has been polarising people. What’s your take on it?

31 Comments

Filed under Perfume Reviews

London, Istanbul, Tel Aviv and Brooklyn by Gallivant

For the last few years I’ve taken holidays exclusively in cities and while not exactly restful, I’ve loved every minute of it. There’s something exhilarating about exploring a metropolis and seeing how you slot into it.

British indie perfume house Gallivant has recently launched with four fragrances that intend to capture this free-wheeling feeling. Founder Nick Steward has worked in the industry for many years, most recently as product and creative director of L’Artisan Parfumeur. He created the collection with two independent perfumers, namely Karine Chevallier and Giorgia Navarra (the latter being the Italian protégée of Bertrand Duchaufour).

 

Gallivant-Brooklyn-Istanbul-London-Telaviv-perfume-1

 

London

Notes: Cucumber, Rose de Mai Absolute and Leather

Being a born and bred Londoner, of course I was curious to try a perfume inspired by my city. Cucumber is a note I struggle with but I don’t notice it specifically. Instead the opening is generally very fresh, green and water-filled, but with something almost skanky just beneath the surface.  Once it dries down, the leather comes across as raw and a little musty, like the leather jackets on the vintage clothes stalls in Camden Market, turning lightly rosy over time. London is an unconventional shape-shifter, morphing from a green aquatic into a floral leather. Like its fragrant namesake, London is full of eccentric contrasts; a place where you can be your own strange self.

 

Istanbul

Notes: Cardamom, Geranium, Patchouli, Vanilla and Amber

I fear the city of Istanbul might rather overwhelm me but I bet it’s a fascinating place to visit with its coming together of east and west, ancient and modern. There is certainly a novel opening to the fragrance of the same name.  The combination of cardamom and herbs makes for an unusually fresh, almost mentholated, spice accord. The aromatics continue into the heart with geranium and lavender backed by spiced amber. It has the texture of suede and gets progressively drier and dustier in the base. Istanbul takes a few unexpected turns on this well-trodden oriental path.

 

Tel Aviv

Notes: Clementine, Jasmine Sambac Absolute, Musks and Deertongue Absolute

It’s nice to see a city represented in scent that is not one of the usual suspects. Tel Aviv brings the laid-back beach vibe into the heart of the city. It’s an easy-to-like tropical floral with a relaxed feel. After a brief burst of clementine, the clean jasmine and fruity ylang-ylang combine to give that luscious, languorous effect so typical of this much-loved genre. You can almost see the bright white light reflecting off the buildings and feel a refreshing airiness among the flowers. I’ve heard Tel Aviv is a hedonistic city and Gallivant were aiming for “lingering 1970s glamour”.  The warm, lightly musky base gives us a taste of that.

 

Brooklyn

Notes: Lemon and Orange Juice, Magnolia, Transparent Flowers and Musks.

I stuck to Manhattan when I visited New York but this feels like a good fit with how I imagine Brooklyn to be. The fragrance is bright and fizzy which chimes with what I assume is the buzzy and hip borough of the city. It reflects the intellectual, creative types you’d expect to find hanging out on the sidewalks.  They probably wouldn’t wear anything fussy so this citrus with substance seems to hit the mark. Fuzzy musks and cardamom massively extend the life of the sherbet-y citrus into the soft, white floral heart and beyond. Somehow Brooklyn manages to feel lively and breezy at the same time.

 

Girls-TV-Show-Based-in-Brooklyn-New-York

 

The focus on top quality materials is clear and I can imagine the streamlined approach appealing to the urban explorers Gallivant is aimed at.  While sleek and accessible, each composition still has a quirk of its own.

It’s also good to see a new brand in the indie/niche sector enter at a sensible price point with the “nomad sized” 30ml EdPs coming in at £65. Individual samples are available as well as a Discovery Set, via the website.

 

Let me know your thoughts about the sound of this new brand in the comments. Do any of the cities appeal to you?

 

 

 

 

 

11 Comments

Filed under Perfume Reviews

Dryad by Papillon Perfumes

“My dryad hath her hiding place/Among ten thousand trees…”

– From The Dryad by Richard Le Gallienne (1866 – 1947)

 

Notes: Cedrat, Bigaradier Orange, Bergamot, Narcissus, Oakmoss, Jonquil, Clary Sage, Orange Blossom, Lavender, Orris, Vetiver, Thyme, Galbanum, Costus, Tarragon, Apricot, Benzoin, Peru Balsam, Deertongue, Styrax,

I’m fortunate to know artisan perfumer Liz Moores and while I can see facets of her character in Papillon’s other fragrances it feels like her fifth creation, Dryad, gets to the core of who she is.

If you follow Liz on social media, you’ll know that she spends a lot of her time nurturing animals (as well as children) and regularly shares the beauty of her surroundings in the New Forest.

Unlike most of us in this day and age, Liz seems to be living her life in sync with nature; celebrating the festivals that mark the changing of the seasons and noticing the waxing and waning of the moon.  She may be a glamour puss but I suspect she is an earth mother at heart.

This way of life must cultivate a great sense of connectedness with the natural world and I can feel that in DryadI tried an early mod of this forthcoming release during a visit to Papillon HQ last year, so I couldn’t wait to sample the final version which will be available from June. 

A dryad is a human-like tree nymph from Greek mythology and these shy creatures often inspired love and desire in the gods.

liz and horse

Liz Moores with her equine soulmate, Perry.

 

As I enter Dryad’s mythical forest domain, I’m met with the unmistakable vivid green aroma of galbanum. Its usual astringency warmed by the sunshine of orange citrus and tamped down by an accord of leafy aromatic herbs.

Oakmoss forms the striking emerald carpet that is underfoot for the duration of the perfume’s development. No doubt this explains in large part why Dryad bears a resemblance to vintage Vol de Nuit parfum, as Claire astutely notes on Take One Thing Off.  Liz tells me that she was able to use a variety of oakmoss that is compliant, in very small amounts, with the IFRA regulations and then built it up with other supporting accords.

There’s something lurking just behind the trees (costus?) that prevents the scent from being entirely wholesome. It takes Dryad from what could have been light, bright and legible and turns it into something dappled, deep and mysterious. It seems to distil the very essence of an enchanted forest.

Dryad is not a fragrance with clear demarcations of head, heart and base but one of gradations, moving over time from sunlit green through to earthy brown. It’s a journey which takes the wearer from the edge of the forest to its shaded, sacred centre. Meandering through the ancient trees at a languid pace, it lasts for an extraordinary long time on skin.

Like Salome, Dryad is meticulously structured. It’s the kind of green chypre/oriental with a complex character and an old soul that’s rare to find these days.

A lecturer at university once remarked in a seminar that I always looked as if I were dreaming of some otherworldly place. Dryad actually takes me there.

 

dreaming_dryad_by_mariyaolshevska-d258yyp.jpg

 

Picture credit: Dreaming Dryad by mariyaolshevska at DeviantArt

28 Comments

Filed under Perfume Reviews

In Rotation: Spring 2017

My perfume choices have been all over the places lately thanks to the changeable weather we’ve been experiencing in the UK this spring. As I write this on Monday 10th April, yesterday was 25 degrees Celsius. For that one day heatwave, I spritzed Dita Von Teese EdP for its tropical flowers, hint of spice and oriental-lite base. Today, it’s back down to 15°C so I’m returning to usual perfume programming which currently consists of the following: –

 

20170315_135625.jpg

 

Vaara, Penhaligon’s

Notes: Quince, Rose Water, Carrot Seeds, Coriander, Saffron, Rose, Freesia, Magnolia, Peony, Honey, White Musk, Cedar, Sandalwood, Benzoin and Tonka Bean.

On mild spring days I’ve been testing out my bottle of Vaara. I bought it when a friend was selling off her perfumes and I picked it up for not very much at all. Still, I’ve been re-assessing my collection, spurred on by Vanessa’s brilliant 20 ‘desert island’ scents post and wanted to check that it warranted a place on my shelf. So far so good. The fabulously unique start of quince, saffron, carrot seed and sparkling rosewater hangs around much longer than I feared, before moving into the rosy heart.

 

28 La Pausa, Chanel

Notes: I can’t find a notes list, but there is A LOT of Iris Pallida.

This huge 200ml bottle was generously gifted to me by the same friend I bought Vaara from.  It’s the original EdT which is no longer available.  Val the Cookie Queen and I tried out the new EdP last year and although it got off to great iris start, it all too quickly dried to down to a squeaky clean vetiver. Maybe the Parfum formulation is a better though. Unlike a lot of people, I’m fortunate in that the EdT lasts reasonably well on me.  This elegant iris feels just right for early spring with its floral-woody character and silky, slightly powdery texture.  28 La Pausa is the refined orris choice.

 

Antonia, Puredistance

Notes: Jasmine, Rose Essence, Ylang Ylang, Orris, Ivy, Galbanum, Vanilla and Vetiver.

Green florals like Antonia are another staple for me when March finally comes around. It’s luxurious, sun-lit and incredibly well blended. Quite a few green fragrances have a rather mealy-mouthed character, owing to the unforgiving nature of galbanum. However, Antonia is lusciously full-bodied and surprisingly warm. This spring goddess is resplendent in emerald with delicate flowers laced through her hair. Thanks to B for my bottle.

 

20170409_113046

 

What fragrances have you been wearing lately?

25 Comments

Filed under Perfume Reviews

Mood Scent 4 – Rainy Day Perfumes

Welcome to the first joint blogging project by Mood Scent 4! We are four perfume bloggers from France, Holland, England and Wales who will be posting on a different joint subject every couple of months.  Each time we will all pick a selection of five or so fragrances to fit a particular mood or occasion. You’ll find links to the other blogs at the end of the post.

We hope you have fun reading our different choices and adding your own in the comments.

Mood scent

I love it when it’s raining outside and I’m cosy indoors with little to do but listen to the raindrops patter against the window pane. Generally I don’t wear perfume on days like these unless I’m testing out a sample, but it’s fun to imagine what would be rainy day appropriate.

Silences by Jacomo

Notes: Orange blossom, Galbanum, Bergamot, Lemon, Green notes, Cassia;  Iris, Jasmine, Narcissus, Hyacinth, Rose, Lily-of-the-Valley,  Vetiver, Musk, Sandalwood, Oakmoss, Cedar and Ambrette.

This one feels just right for a rainy day in spring, both by name and scent. While most people have retreated indoors, you might want to take a peaceful walk in the rain. A soaking from an April shower seems to amplify the green aroma of vegetation in the air. Silences is a verdant green with a few flower petals and a little powder, that has a calming effect. It is also a bargain if you can find it online.

Celtic Fire by Union

Notes: Pine needles, Fir balsam, Marmite, Birch Tar, Peat and Bog Myrtle.

CELTIC_FIRE_U_001

My dream rainy day scenario would be eating toast by a roaring fire inside a cabin up in the Highlands of Scotland. The next best thing is Celtic Fire with its peaty, smoky aroma and quirky use of a salty Marmite accord. It’s a statement perfume with a certain meaty substance to it. There’s nothing quite like it.

Dzing! by L’Artisan Parfumeur

Notes: Leather, Ginger, Tonka Bean, Musk, White Woods, Caramel, Saffron, Toffee, Candy Apple and Cotton Candy

dzing

If you do choose to spend your rainy day with a good book and it’s not the digital kind, then Dzing! would be a good accompaniment. It may recreate the smell of the circus but there’s also a whiff of old paperbacks in there, which have started to curl at the edges and smell of musty vanilla. It’s also a clever, completely unique scent and you don’t have to worry about the soupçon of skank if it’s just going to be you and your novel of choice.

L’Eau Froide by Serge Lutens

Notes: Olibanum, Sea Water, Musk, Vetiver, Mint, Incense, Pepper and Ginger.

I know there’s not a lot of love for the Serge Lutens L’Eau line but I like this one. I can’t handle big incense perfumes like the mighty Avignon by Commes des Garcons, so a gentle watery incense with aromatic touches suits me just fine. L’Eau Froide is a softly refreshing fragrance that wouldn’t be too distracting and could match a contemplative mood on a wet day.

Vanilla Smoke by Aftelier Perfumes

Notes: Yellow Mandarin, Siam Wood, Saffron Absolute, Vanillin, Vanilla Absolute, Lapsang Souchong, Ambergris and Coumarin

Vanilla-Smoke-Aftelier-Fragrantica

Here you get gorgeous, soothing vanilla wrapped up in lovely, rubbery leather. Vanilla Smoke is my ideal comfort scent and will be particularly perfect when autumn rolls around and it starts to get cold and rainy. Enjoy it while taking a rain check – put your feet up and sip one of Mandy’s fabulous Fragranced Teas.

rainy day

Make sure you check out the other posts at Megan In Sainte Maxime, I Scent You A Day and L’Esperessence.

What are your own Rainy Day Perfumes?

24 Comments

Filed under Perfume Reviews

NAJA by Vero Profumo

Hypnotised by the cosmic serpent…

Notes:  Osmanthus Absolute, Melon, Linden Blossom and Tobacco

 

The release of NAJA has been long anticipated by the many fans – including myself – of rebel perfumer Vero Kern.  It was finally launched at Esxence in Milan last week and I was lucky enough to receive a sample thanks to my dear friends at Australian Perfume Junkies.

NAJA is Vero Profumo’s Jubilee Scent, celebrating 10 years of this unique independent perfume house, with a limited distribution of 650 50ml bottles.

It is a mystical creation, rich in symbolism, which holds the promise of redemption and rebirth.

NAJA is a fragrance of magic and mystery, as exemplified by its stunning black bottle.

 

naja bottle

 

The snake is NAJA’s familiar and it is one of the oldest and most widespread symbols in mythology. Snakes (or serpents) features in Greek, Ancient Egyptian, African, Aboriginal, Native American, Indochina, Norse, Christian, Hindu and Jewish mythologies.  Primarily it stands for the creative life force, with the shedding of the snake’s skin representing transformation, immortality and healing.

Historically, snakes have been used in shamanic rituals to bridge the gap between our world and that of the spirits. The snake’s venom is also associated with the chemicals in plants which have the power to heal (or poison) as well as expand consciousness. This mirrors the tobacco plant which again has been used by shamans for its medicinal and psychotropic properties.

In NAJA, tobacco takes the form of the serpent which spirals throughout the length of the fragrance’s development.  The first hit however is a drop-dead gorgeous combination of fruit (mostly lime) and flowers over a fine layer of seductive powder.  The slice of melon combined with the apricot of osmanthus and the luscious lime of linden blossom, gives the fragrance spectacular radiance. Vero always uses fruit accords so beautifully in her perfumes, elevating them to the level of sensual.

I’ve never found a tobacco fragrance that works for me because they are often loaded with cherry and immortelle or they’re too dry and traditionally manly for my taste. Here the tobacco is golden in tone and incredibly smooth. In the base, it becomes suede-like in both texture and scent. At this stage, the olfactory hallmark of Vero Profumo’s orientals (see reviews of Onda and Rozy) is most apparent. It’s a somewhat animalic, tarry smokiness that gives them the classic feel of iconic perfumes from yesteryear, such as Caron’s Tabac Blond.

You might look at the symbolism and the packaging and expect a fragrance of intimidating darkness, but you’d be wrong. Just as the snake embodies the duality of good and evil, poison and cure, so NAJA is imbued with the duality of light and shade, masculine and feminine, spirituality and humanity. It is my ideal, multi-faceted tobacco fragrance and my favourite work by Vero to date.

Unlike previous releases, there is only one formulation of NAJA.  It has above average projection and amazing day-into-night longevity.

Prepare to embrace the serpent.

 

naja cobra two.jpg

 

Do you think you will fall under NAJA’s spell?

50 Comments

Filed under Perfume Reviews

Parallel by 4160 Tuesdays and Get Lippie

Notes: Rose Absolute, Frankincense, Black Pepper and White Woods, Caraway and Mandarin Petitgrain.

As you may know, a few years ago beauty and perfume blogger Louise Woollam of Get Lippie experienced the nightmarish olfactory dysfunction, parosmia. She lost her sense of smell after a cold but when it came it back, nothing smelled as it should and most things smelt absolutely awful. You can see her talking about this traumatic time in her life tonight in Episode 5 of Incredible Medicine: Dr Weston’s Casebook on BBC Two at 9pm.

The fragrance Paradox was created with perfumer Sarah McCartney in a successful attempt to make a scent Louise could actually enjoy at this very dark time. It was a lovely, chilled, green violet perfume with a touch of lavender and spine of orris.

Now, to celebrate her sense of smell returning to normal, they have reunited to make the spicy oriental Louise has always wanted. The result is Parallel which again is available from 4160 Tuesdays. I love how, like most of the perfumes, you can get it in a 30ml bottle.

 

tuesdays

 

The mood boosting, citrus green-ness of mandarin petitgrain characterises the opening of Parallel and it feels like a fitting start to the optimistic story this perfume is telling. Louise must have felt such excitement as well as relief when things started to smell as they should once again.

The core of Parallel is a combination of peppery resin and almost creamy orange. It starts out punchy and invigorating and smooths out to create a constant, orange-tinted resinous buzz.  It’s backed up by soft cashmere  woods and just a splash of rose. This isn’t an all-natural perfume but there’s something about its simplicity and oil-like quality on the skin that reminds me of one.

Those wary of big orientals need not fear as Parallel stays close to the body. Far from being overwhelming, I find it extremely easy to wear and I’m not drawn to this genre usually.

It’s lovely that Sarah and Louise came together once more under much happier circumstances to create a perfume which completes this scented story. I’m looking forward to seeing the tale being told on tonight’s programme which is all about those with rare conditions. It also features a man whose bones are stronger than granite and a woman with two wombs.

It will serve as an important reminder that even if you can’t triumph over a medical condition you can always find ways around obstacles in order to live a life truly worth living. This is something I try to tell myself every day.

 

hope-2

 

8 Comments

Filed under Perfume Reviews

Guest Posting on APJ

I’m slipping into Portia’s skyscraper heels today on Australian Perfume Junkies as she continues to whirl her way across Europe, landing in London at the end of this month. Can’t wait!

V hat

Portia and I in Venice around this time last year.

 

So if you’d like to read my thought on Sensual Orchid by LM Parfums you can hop across to my review on APJ by clicking here.

Do check out Portia’s brilliant Scent Diary posts while you’re there.

 

 

4 Comments

Filed under Perfume Reviews